SoC’s Knight Center and CSIS forum continues to tackle big issues




Photo courtesy of CSIS

(From left to right) Kenneth Goodman, co-director of UM's Ethics Programs with U.S. Under Secretary of State for Economic, Energy and Agricultural Affairs Robert D. Hormats, panel moderator Andrew Schwartz, of CSIS, Jennifer Cooke, director of CSIS's Africa Program; and Ruben Jeffery III, former U.S. Under Secretary of State for Economic, Energy and Agricultural Affairs.

Under Secretary of State Hormats and experts discuss responsible resources trade at CSIS/Knight Center panel - "There is a moral responsibility of the news media to say 'we care.'"

Washington, DC - The Knight Center for International Media at the University of Miami School of Communication, continuing its partnership with the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC, hosted another installment of "Our Global Challenges: A Series of Dialogues on the Pressing Issues of Our Time," with a panel on "The Responsible Resources Trade."

The May panel featured Robert D. Hormats, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Economic, Energy, and Agricultural Affairs; Ruben Jeffery III, Senior Adviser, CSIS and former Under Secretary of State for Economic, Energy; Jennifer Cooke, Director of CSIS's Africa Program; and Kenneth W. Goodman, Ph.D., the co-director of UM's Ethics Programs, including the Business Ethics program, and founder and director of the Bioethics Program and Pan American Bioethics Initiative.

The panel addressed the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the illicit exploitation and trade in natural resources that has financed armed groups and created greater conflict in war zones, specifically the Congo, and the importance of good governance in relation to trade.

Citing the State Department's goal to work with the UN and other stakeholders, Hormats said the U.S. would work to promote transparency, accountability, and the rule of law within state authority so that people could trust government to affirm their rights, and strengthen the infrastructure for legitimate trade, investment, and economic growth.

Goodman stressed the ethical approach for news media was "not watching from a distance."

"There is a moral responsibility of the news media to say 'Why do we care about the extraction of certain minerals that cause social upheaval? Why do we care about the Congo?' It is because but for us they wouldn't be doing this," Goodman said.

The United States and other global leaders should make changes to lessen the impact that their countries have for minerals have on other regions.

"We have some moral responsibility to use what good offices we have to mitigate some of the consequences of our diet. To be able to share in these natural resources and to support and foster their responsible development," Goodman said.

To view, Our Global Challenges: A Series of Dialogues on the Pressing Issues of Our Time - The Responsible Resources Trade visit: http://csis.org/event/our-global-challenges-series-dialogues-pressing-issues-our-time-responsible-resources-trade